Quick Answer: What Is Controllable Risk?

What is an example of a controllable risk factor?

Controllable risk factors include: Smoking.

High LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and low HDL, or “good” cholesterol.

Uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure).

Which is a controllable risk factor for stroke?

High Blood Pressure is the No. 1 Controllable Risk Factor for Stroke. Nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure, or hypertension.

What are the six health risk behaviors?

23 These six prior- ity health-risk behaviors are: alcohol and other drug use, behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence (including suicide), tobacco use, unhealthy dietary behaviors, physical inactivity and sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted …

What is the biggest risk factor for stroke?

The major risk factors for stroke include:High blood pressure.Diabetes.Heart and blood vessel diseases. … High LDL cholesterol levels.Smoking.Brain aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). … Viral Infections or conditions that cause inflammation, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. … Age.More items…

What foods can cause a stroke?

Here are five foods that cause the damage that leads to stroke….Some common, safe-sounding ingredients that really mean salt:Baking soda.Baking powder.MSG (monosodium glutamate)Disodium phosphate.Sodium alginate.

What are positive risk factors?

What are the Positive Risk Factors. Age. Family History. Cigarette Smoking. Sedentary Lifestyle.

What is a controllable risk factor?

Controllable risk factors are those which you can take steps to change or influence. Diet. Smoking. Excessive alcohol consumption. Inactivity.

What are 4 risk factors for heart disease?

Major Risk FactorsHigh Blood Pressure (Hypertension). High blood pressure increases your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. … High Blood Cholesterol. One of the major risk factors for heart disease is high blood cholesterol. … Diabetes. … Obesity and Overweight. … Smoking. … Physical Inactivity. … Gender. … Heredity.More items…

What are the 11 coronary risk factors?

There are many risk factors for CAD and some can be controlled but not others. The risk factors that can be controlled (modifiable) are: High BP; high blood cholesterol levels; smoking; diabetes; overweight or obesity; lack of physical activity; unhealthy diet and stress.

What are 5 risk factors for CVD?

A: Risk factors for heart disease and other cardiovascular disease include:Smoking.Lack of exercise.Diet.Obesity.High blood pressure.High LDL or low HDL cholesterol levels.Family history of heart disease or other cardiovascular disease.Age.

How can I prevent strokes?

Stroke PreventionControl high blood pressure (hypertension). Know your numbers and keep them low.Quit tobacco. Smoking raises the risk of stroke.Control diabetes. … Manage a healthy weight. … Eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. … Exercise. … Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. … Treat obstructive sleep apnea, if present.More items…

What are the 4 controllable risk factors?

The “controllable” risk factors are:Smoking.High blood pressure.High blood cholesterol.High blood sugar (diabetes)Obesity and overweight.Obesity and Overweight.Physical inactivity.Stress.

What are the 3 risk factors?

The three categories of risk factors are detailed here:Increasing Age. The majority of people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 or older. … Male gender. … Heredity (including race) … Tobacco smoke. … High blood cholesterol. … High blood pressure. … Physical inactivity. … Obesity and being overweight.More items…

What risk factors can you control?

Risk factors that can be controlled include blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol, weight, smoking and other wellness factors like physical activity and stress level. Understanding the role these factors play in your health is an important step in reducing your risk for heart disease.

Who is at high risk for heart attack?

Men age 45 or older and women age 55 or older are more likely to have a heart attack than are younger men and women. Tobacco. This includes smoking and long-term exposure to secondhand smoke. High blood pressure.